The Testicular Cancer Association

THE TESTICULAR CANCER ASSOCIATION

Where is the Testicular Cancer Association?

 

When first doing research on testicular cancer, some people look for “the one” leading organization, such as the American Heart Association, American Lung Association, or American Cancer Society.

 

There is no central group for testicular cancer, though one of the goals of the Max Mallory Foundation is to unify testicular cancer resources and information for the good of the public. That’s why we created this page.

 

Your donations help us coordinate testicular cancer awareness and help, preventing overlap. You can donate here.

 

Testicular cancer is the leading cancer in men age 15-35.

 

If you’re just getting started and want quick answers:

A source of information on testicular cancer that is straightforward and easy-to-understand is found here from the Cancer Support Community, the largest professionally led nonprofit network of cancer support worldwide, part of Gilda’s Club.

The three organizations listed below also have valuable information and various ways to communicate and connect with them.

 

The leading national organizations:

There are three major organizations devoted to testicular cancer in the U.S. and they all do great work. The groups listed below are all 501(c)3 organizations. They are listed here in the order of date founded.

 

Testicular Cancer Society

The Testicular Cancer Society is dedicated to increasing awareness and education about the testicular cancer and providing support for fighters, survivors, and caregivers. The society was founded in 2008 by Mike Craycraft after a testicular cancer diagnosis. They have instructions on self-exams, a FAQ section and more.

 

Testicular Cancer Foundation

The Testicular Cancer Foundation provides education and support to young men to raise awareness about testicular cancer. They support families of testicular cancer patients and share resources with the medical and healthcare communities, schools, and various young men’s groups. It was founded in 2009 by Matt Ferstler after he was diagnosed with testicular cancer.

 

Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation

The Testicular Cancer Awareness Foundation is dedicated in the fight against testicular cancer through awareness and outreach, promoting the importance of monthly self-exams for early detection, giving support and guidance to patients and families, being a resource for the medical community, and providing financial assistance to those in need. It was founded by Kim Jones, whose son Jordan Jones was originally diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2007, overcame it, and again battled it starting in 2015. Unfortunately, Jordan passed away June 8, 2016–only 3 weeks after Max Mallory.

Two other important organizations:

 

Though the groups listed below are not specifically only for testicular cancer, they are two unique organizations who serve those with cancer, caregivers, and survivors by addressing specific areas not addressed by other cancer groups. The Max Mallory Foundation supports both of these 501(c)3 organizations. They are listed here in the order of date founded.

 

Imerman Angels

Imerman Angels provides free one-on-one support to cancer fighters, survivors, and caregivers, including those affected by testicular cancer, throughout the world. It was founded in 2003 by Jonny Imerman after his battle with testicular cancer. Imerman Angels was particular help for Max Mallory, who had an Imerman Angel to talk with one-on-one during his battle with cancer, and also of help to Chuck Mallory, Max’s father, who had an Imerman Angel to help him deal with grief after Max passed away. (Jonny Imerman also founded Cloztalk, a company creating apparel to financially support and promote nonprofit organizations.)

 

Lacuna Loft

 

Every year, 70,000 young adults (ages 13-39) are diagnosed with cancer. Lacuna Loft, providing age-appropriate online support for young adult cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers, is the only organization offering diverse online programs regardless of cancer diagnosis and regardless of where they live. It is a community-funded charity that provides all programs at no charge to young adults facing cancer. This innovative group was founded by Mallory Casperson in 2011, when she was on the path to a PhD and was suddenly diagnosed with Stage II Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. Lacuna Loft was of special interest to Max Mallory, and he had intended to write for the organization.